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2011-2012 Events

Chair: Craig Werner

Afro-American Studies, UW-Madison

REPRISE: How? Research Methods in the Humanities

212 University Club Building
Mon, May 7, 2012 3:00 PM

The Institute for Research in the Humanities (IRH) will end its year-long weekly seminars with a reprise of its opening seminar on research methods in the humanities. The panel continues IRH’s broad discussions about the humanities in the effort to understand the intellectual, ethical, and political underpinnings of what brings us together as a division of knowledge.

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Caroline Boswell

Humanistic Studies and European History, UW-Green Bay

REPRISE: How? Research Methods in the Humanities

212 University Club Building
Mon, May 7, 2012 3:00 PM

The Institute for Research in the Humanities (IRH) will end its year-long weekly seminars with a reprise of its opening seminar on research methods in the humanities. The panel continues IRH’s broad discussions about the humanities in the effort to understand the intellectual, ethical, and political underpinnings of what brings us together as a division of knowledge.

Download panel description

Esther Eidinow

Ancient Greek History, University of Nottingham

REPRISE: How? Research Methods in the Humanities

212 University Club Building
Mon, May 7, 2012 3:00 PM

The Institute for Research in the Humanities (IRH) will end its year-long weekly seminars with a reprise of its opening seminar on research methods in the humanities. The panel continues IRH’s broad discussions about the humanities in the effort to understand the intellectual, ethical, and political underpinnings of what brings us together as a division of knowledge.

Download panel description

Richard Goodkin

French and Italian, UW-Madison

REPRISE: How? Research Methods in the Humanities

212 University Club Building
Mon, May 7, 2012 3:00 PM

The Institute for Research in the Humanities (IRH) will end its year-long weekly seminars with a reprise of its opening seminar on research methods in the humanities. The panel continues IRH’s broad discussions about the humanities in the effort to understand the intellectual, ethical, and political underpinnings of what brings us together as a division of knowledge.

Download panel description

Erin Lambert

History, UW-Madison

REPRISE: How? Research Methods in the Humanities

212 University Club Building
Mon, May 7, 2012 3:00 PM

The Institute for Research in the Humanities (IRH) will end its year-long weekly seminars with a reprise of its opening seminar on research methods in the humanities. The panel continues IRH’s broad discussions about the humanities in the effort to understand the intellectual, ethical, and political underpinnings of what brings us together as a division of knowledge.

Download panel description

Mary Louise Roberts

History, UW-Madison

REPRISE: How? Research Methods in the Humanities

212 University Club Building
Mon, May 7, 2012 3:00 PM

The Institute for Research in the Humanities (IRH) will end its year-long weekly seminars with a reprise of its opening seminar on research methods in the humanities. The panel continues IRH’s broad discussions about the humanities in the effort to understand the intellectual, ethical, and political underpinnings of what brings us together as a division of knowledge.

Download panel description

Matt Waters

Classics and Ancient History, UW-Eau Claire

Of Lies and Bizarre Tales: Ctesias and the Persian Empire

212 University Club Building
Mon, Apr 30, 2012 3:00 PM

The Achaemenid Persian Empire (c. 550-330 BC) at its height stretched from the Danube to the Indus and from the Himalayas to the Sahara. The Greek Ctesias served as a doctor to the Persian king Artaxerxes II (reigned 404-358 BC) and wrote an extensive history of the Persian Empire, the Persica, to his time. Only fragments of this work survive, scattered in various ancient authors and in a severely-truncated epitome by the Byzantine patriarch and scholar Photius (9th century AD). Ctesias’ work has been largely marginalized in light of the fundamental problems of reliability with the extant account. As recent work has emphasized, however, such criticism often stems from a misguided approach to what his work may offer us. This seminar will discuss some preliminary observations based on analysis of Near Eastern influences on Ctesias’ work.

Enchantings: Modernity, Culture, and the State in Postcolonial Africa

1255 Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery
Thu, Apr 26, 2012 12:00 AM

The symposium aims to bring into close systematic interaction three composite entities that traditionally are the objects of different study areas and therefore are studied together most often casually or rarely: contemporary African cultural and social forms and practices, the postcolonial African political state, and the larger modern context that subtend the two. The goal is to help us better understand in a multi-sided way (1) the sociopolitical underpinnings of African cultural and social forms and practices; (2) the cultural and social determinations on the character and performance of the African state as a genre, and (3) the modern context that is the generative canvas of the interactions.

Visit the conference page for the program

Kathryn Sanchez

Spanish and Portuguese, UW-Madison

Racial Cannibalism: Carmen Miranda and the Performance of White ‘Negritude’ on the Brazilian Stage of the 1930s

212 University Club Building
Mon, Apr 23, 2012 3:00 PM

This project explores race and its representation in the performing arts as central to the modern concept of Brazilianness in the decades following the pivotal week of Modern Art held in São Paulo, Brazil in 1922. In this presentation I will explore the racial discourse of Brazil’s most iconic white performer of all times, Carmen Miranda (1909-1955), whose signature look embodied the racially-charged ‘baiana’ or Afro-Brazilian street vendor who would typically carry large baskets of fruit and food on top of their turbans. Set against the racial politics of the time, and in particular the widespread current of Brazil as a racial democracy, I engage Carmen Miranda’s whitening of the Afro-Brazilian image with the ideological manifestation of a Brazilian racial hegemony through which operates a culturalist commodification of Afro-Brazilianness for a white, elite and often foreign audience. I aim to discuss the literal and figurative black masks that were used, politically and culturally, to project an ‘authentic’ race-blind Brazilian culture and that go countercurrent to the widely proclaimed racial democracy.

Lee Willis

History, UW-Stevens Point

Gulf Coast Slave Smuggling: The Clandestine Slave Trade, circa 1830s-1850s

212 University Club Building
Mon, Apr 16, 2012 3:00 PM

In 1808, Congress forbade the importation of foreign slaves into the United States and the interstate (or domestic) slave trade became the only legal method of buying and selling human chattel before the Civil War. Yet historians believe that traders continually violated the international ban in a clandestine slave trade. Conservative estimates hold that smugglers introduced approximately 54,000 enslaved people into the United States, roughly 1,000 people per year, between 1808 and 1865. Though the interstate slave trade has been researched extensively and deservedly so, the details of the U.S. clandestine slave trade are largely unknown. This presentation will explore several failed slaving expeditions in the Gulf of Mexico as a means to understand the international conspiracies behind these ventures as well as how the trade changed over time.

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