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2013-2014 Events

Valerie Barske

History, UW-Stevens Point

Last Seminar

212 University Club Building
Mon, May 5, 2014 3:00 PM

The final seminar of the year provides time and space for self-reflection, collaborative and individual. It’s a fair guess to say that no one did as much work as they hoped to during his or her fellowship term. That’s par for the course. But it’s also a fair guess to say that everyone's concept of their project and specific ideas within it grew, expanded, contracted, shifted, turned corners, refocused, got turned upside down or right side out: in short—changed, even transformed.

How did your project change, if at all? And why?

Did any of these changes reflect your experience in the interdisciplinary environment of the Institute? If so, how?

How might you define the significance of this environment for your research to a different audiences: (1) Your immediate subfield? (2) Your colleagues, dean, president and/ or Chancellor? (3) The “General Public”?

Eight IRH fellows drawn from a variety of fields, methodololgies, historical periods, and areas of the world will reflect on these questions for about 5-7 minutes each (c. 1 hour). Their remarks are intended to spark a second hour of open discussion, with all fellows urged to participate.

Reception to follow at 5:30 P.M. in the University Club.

Ayelet Ben-Yishai

English, University of Haifa

Last Seminar

212 University Club Building
Mon, May 5, 2014 3:00 PM

The final seminar of the year provides time and space for self-reflection, collaborative and individual. It’s a fair guess to say that no one did as much work as they hoped to during his or her fellowship term. That’s par for the course. But it’s also a fair guess to say that everyone's concept of their project and specific ideas within it grew, expanded, contracted, shifted, turned corners, refocused, got turned upside down or right side out: in short—changed, even transformed.

How did your project change, if at all? And why?

Did any of these changes reflect your experience in the interdisciplinary environment of the Institute? If so, how?

How might you define the significance of this environment for your research to a different audiences: (1) Your immediate subfield? (2) Your colleagues, dean, president and/ or Chancellor? (3) The “General Public”?

Eight IRH fellows drawn from a variety of fields, methodololgies, historical periods, and areas of the world will reflect on these questions for about 5-7 minutes each (c. 1 hour). Their remarks are intended to spark a second hour of open discussion, with all fellows urged to participate.

Reception to follow at 5:30 P.M. in the University Club.

Christy Clark-Pujara

Afro-American Studies, UW-Madison

Last Seminar

212 University Club Building
Mon, May 5, 2014 3:00 PM

The final seminar of the year provides time and space for self-reflection, collaborative and individual. It’s a fair guess to say that no one did as much work as they hoped to during his or her fellowship term. That’s par for the course. But it’s also a fair guess to say that everyone's concept of their project and specific ideas within it grew, expanded, contracted, shifted, turned corners, refocused, got turned upside down or right side out: in short—changed, even transformed.

How did your project change, if at all? And why?

Did any of these changes reflect your experience in the interdisciplinary environment of the Institute? If so, how?

How might you define the significance of this environment for your research to a different audiences: (1) Your immediate subfield? (2) Your colleagues, dean, president and/ or Chancellor? (3) The “General Public”?

Eight IRH fellows drawn from a variety of fields, methodololgies, historical periods, and areas of the world will reflect on these questions for about 5-7 minutes each (c. 1 hour). Their remarks are intended to spark a second hour of open discussion, with all fellows urged to participate.

Reception to follow at 5:30 P.M. in the University Club.

Anne Duncan

Classics and Religious Studies, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Last Seminar

212 University Club Building
Mon, May 5, 2014 3:00 PM

The final seminar of the year provides time and space for self-reflection, collaborative and individual. It’s a fair guess to say that no one did as much work as they hoped to during his or her fellowship term. That’s par for the course. But it’s also a fair guess to say that everyone's concept of their project and specific ideas within it grew, expanded, contracted, shifted, turned corners, refocused, got turned upside down or right side out: in short—changed, even transformed.

How did your project change, if at all? And why?

Did any of these changes reflect your experience in the interdisciplinary environment of the Institute? If so, how?

How might you define the significance of this environment for your research to a different audiences: (1) Your immediate subfield? (2) Your colleagues, dean, president and/ or Chancellor? (3) The “General Public”?

Eight IRH fellows drawn from a variety of fields, methodololgies, historical periods, and areas of the world will reflect on these questions for about 5-7 minutes each (c. 1 hour). Their remarks are intended to spark a second hour of open discussion, with all fellows urged to participate.

Reception to follow at 5:30 P.M. in the University Club.

Joseph Marchal

Religious Studies, Women's and Gender Studies, Ball State University

Last Seminar

212 University Club Building
Mon, May 5, 2014 3:00 PM

The final seminar of the year provides time and space for self-reflection, collaborative and individual. It’s a fair guess to say that no one did as much work as they hoped to during his or her fellowship term. That’s par for the course. But it’s also a fair guess to say that everyone's concept of their project and specific ideas within it grew, expanded, contracted, shifted, turned corners, refocused, got turned upside down or right side out: in short—changed, even transformed.

How did your project change, if at all? And why?

Did any of these changes reflect your experience in the interdisciplinary environment of the Institute? If so, how?

How might you define the significance of this environment for your research to a different audiences: (1) Your immediate subfield? (2) Your colleagues, dean, president and/ or Chancellor? (3) The “General Public”?

Eight IRH fellows drawn from a variety of fields, methodololgies, historical periods, and areas of the world will reflect on these questions for about 5-7 minutes each (c. 1 hour). Their remarks are intended to spark a second hour of open discussion, with all fellows urged to participate.

Reception to follow at 5:30 P.M. in the University Club.

Matthew Rarey

Art History, UW-Madison

Last Seminar

212 University Club Building
Mon, May 5, 2014 3:00 PM

The final seminar of the year provides time and space for self-reflection, collaborative and individual. It’s a fair guess to say that no one did as much work as they hoped to during his or her fellowship term. That’s par for the course. But it’s also a fair guess to say that everyone's concept of their project and specific ideas within it grew, expanded, contracted, shifted, turned corners, refocused, got turned upside down or right side out: in short—changed, even transformed.

How did your project change, if at all? And why?

Did any of these changes reflect your experience in the interdisciplinary environment of the Institute? If so, how?

How might you define the significance of this environment for your research to a different audiences: (1) Your immediate subfield? (2) Your colleagues, dean, president and/ or Chancellor? (3) The “General Public”?

Eight IRH fellows drawn from a variety of fields, methodololgies, historical periods, and areas of the world will reflect on these questions for about 5-7 minutes each (c. 1 hour). Their remarks are intended to spark a second hour of open discussion, with all fellows urged to participate.

Reception to follow at 5:30 P.M. in the University Club.

Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen

History, UW-Madison

Last Seminar

212 University Club Building
Mon, May 5, 2014 3:00 PM

The final seminar of the year provides time and space for self-reflection, collaborative and individual. It’s a fair guess to say that no one did as much work as they hoped to during his or her fellowship term. That’s par for the course. But it’s also a fair guess to say that everyone's concept of their project and specific ideas within it grew, expanded, contracted, shifted, turned corners, refocused, got turned upside down or right side out: in short—changed, even transformed.

How did your project change, if at all? And why?

Did any of these changes reflect your experience in the interdisciplinary environment of the Institute? If so, how?

How might you define the significance of this environment for your research to a different audiences: (1) Your immediate subfield? (2) Your colleagues, dean, president and/ or Chancellor? (3) The “General Public”?

Eight IRH fellows drawn from a variety of fields, methodololgies, historical periods, and areas of the world will reflect on these questions for about 5-7 minutes each (c. 1 hour). Their remarks are intended to spark a second hour of open discussion, with all fellows urged to participate.

Reception to follow at 5:30 P.M. in the University Club.

Mary Louise Roberts

History, UW-Madison

Last Seminar

212 University Club Building
Mon, May 5, 2014 3:00 PM

The final seminar of the year provides time and space for self-reflection, collaborative and individual. It’s a fair guess to say that no one did as much work as they hoped to during his or her fellowship term. That’s par for the course. But it’s also a fair guess to say that everyone's concept of their project and specific ideas within it grew, expanded, contracted, shifted, turned corners, refocused, got turned upside down or right side out: in short—changed, even transformed.

How did your project change, if at all? And why?

Did any of these changes reflect your experience in the interdisciplinary environment of the Institute? If so, how?

How might you define the significance of this environment for your research to a different audiences: (1) Your immediate subfield? (2) Your colleagues, dean, president and/ or Chancellor? (3) The “General Public”?

Eight IRH fellows drawn from a variety of fields, methodololgies, historical periods, and areas of the world will reflect on these questions for about 5-7 minutes each (c. 1 hour). Their remarks are intended to spark a second hour of open discussion, with all fellows urged to participate.

Reception to follow at 5:30 P.M. in the University Club.

Marguerite Helmers

English, UW-Oshkosh

Ireland’s Memorial Records, 1914-1918: The Fantastic Imagery of Harry Clarke

212 University Club Building
Mon, Apr 28, 2014 3:30 PM

In 1919, Sir John French, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, brought together representatives from throughout Ireland to establish a national war memorial that would commemorate the 50,000 Irish dead from the First World War. By 1923, despite two wars on Irish soil, an assassination attempt on French, and the problematic position of Irish soldiers who fought for the British in the war, the Committee of the Irish National War Memorial published one hundred copies of an eight-volume set of alphabetized rolls titled Ireland’s Memorial Records, 1914-1918: Being the names of Irishmen who fell in the Great European War. Engravings by the Dublin illustrator and stained glass designer Harry Clarke (1889-1931) distinguish these volumes. They are copiously and intricately engraved in the fantastic Art Nouveau style for which Clarke is recognized, incorporating nationalist Celtic imagery, battle scenes, and silhouettes of soldiers in action. Housed in a special bookroom designed by Edwin Lutyens at the national war memorial in Dublin and relatively forgotten since their publication, Ireland’s Memorial Records reveal a complex response to traditions of war remembrance in England and Ireland.

Anne Cheng

English and the Center for African American Studies, Princeton University

Sushi, Otters, and Mermaids: Race at the Intersection of Food and Animal Studies

L160 Conrad A. Elvehjem Building
Thu, Apr 24, 2014 7:30 PM

What do sushi, food, race, and anthropology have to do with each other? Taking a scene of sushi eating in David Wong Louie's short story "Bottles of Beaujolais" as a spring board into a larger meditation on the "nature" of human eating, this paper traces the often unspoken racial logic that subtends and connects the question of who is human and what is it that we eat.

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